Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 Violation: Man Selling $1M In Fake Native Artwork—Sentenced For Two Years

Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 Violation: Cristobal Magno Rodrigo Sentenced for Two Years

Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 Violation
Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 Violation Cristobal Magno Rodrigo Played A Pivotal Role In The Dissimulating Act (Photo: The Daily Express US)

In a legal verdict, Cristobal “Cris” Magno Rodrigo (a resident of Washington state) is set to serve “two years behind bars…”  for orchestrating an elaborate scheme (violating the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990)— involving “counterfeit Alaska Native artwork.” The judgment (of Rodrigo’s Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 violation) represents a significant milestone…  in upholding the Indian Arts and Crafts Act, enacted in 1990. The objective of the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 is to safeguard the cultural heritage of indigenous communities in America.

REFERENCE: THE ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS

Rodrigo (the one who violated the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990) and his family masterminded the deceptive operation (involving counterfeit Alaska Native artwork) … which spanned from 2016 to 2021. With their acts of violating the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990, Rodrigo and his family deceived both customers and the art market resulting in their arrest. They [Rodrigo and his family] marketed “Philippine-produced stone carvings” and totem poles as genuine Alaska Native creations (violating the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990) racking up over $1 million in sales.

Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 Violation: Rodrigo Played A Pivotal Role In The Dissimulating Act

The violation of the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 involved Rodrigo’s companies… (Alaska Stone Arts LLC and Rail Creek LLC) passing off thousands of Alaska Native counterfeit artworks. Rodrigo (the one who violated the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990) with over two decades of experience in the field, played a pivotal role in the dissimulating act. He [Cristobal Magno Rodrigo—the one who violated the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990] directed Filipino woodcarvers in the Philippines to produce Alaska Native imitation pieces—which were then shipped to the United States.

REFERENCE:  THE NATIVE NEWS ONLINE

Judge Timothy Burgess imposed the “two-year prison sentence” on Cristobal Magno Rodrigo… the longest ever handed down for an Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 violation. Additionally, Judge Burgess also charged financial penalties on Rodrigo including a $54,204.81 restitution payment and a $60,000 donation to the “Tlingit and Haida Central Council Vocational Program.” Furthermore, Rodrigo (violator of the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990) must “pen an apology” to run in the Ketchikan Daily News and serve “three years” of supervised release.


RELATED: Asseveration Of Missouri Attorney General Andrew Bailey: Core Of The Legal Dispute Appertaining Missouri’s Proposed Amendments

 

The Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 violation by Rodrigo serves as a resounding message: fraudulent misrepresentation of indigenous art will not be tolerated —violators (just like Rodrigo) will be held accountable under the law. Conclusively, Cristobal Magno Rodrigo’s apprehension caused by his violation of the Indian Arts And Crafts Act Of 1990 — reinforces the commitment of US Law enforcers: to preserving the “cultural heritage of Alaska Native” and American Indian communities.

Leave a Reply