Murphy Hokey Law

February 23, 2024

Ex Black Panther Passes Away In Jail After Maintaining His Innocence In The Officer’s Bombing Death

Ex Black Panther Passes Away In Jail After Maintaining His Innocence In The Officer's Bombing Death

One of the two ex-Black Panthers who insisted on their innocence about the 1970 bombing that killed a white Omaha police officer has passed away in prison.

Ex Black Panther Passes Away In Jail After Maintaining His Innocence In The Officer

A representative for the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services announced on Friday that Ed Poindexter, who was 79 years old, had passed away the previous day. In 2016, David Rice, the additional defendant found guilty in the murder of Omaha Police Officer Larry Minard, passed away in custody.

The two contended that they were singled out by an FBI programme designed to weaken radical political organisations due to their affiliation with the Black Panthers, and they contested the veracity of important evidence that proved them guilty.

Both Poindexter and Rice had doubts about the primary witness in the case who had connected them to the bombing scheme, but their multiple appeals had been denied. Although an adolescent stated he made the call, a tape of the conversation that led Minard to a deserted residence before a homemade bomb went off seems to have been made by an adult male.

Years later, as part of one of Poindexter’s appeals, a voice specialist examined it and declared it “highly probable” that the witness’s voice, who had been given immunity in exchange for his testimony, wasn’t on the audio. The teenager stated in court that he was told to plant the dynamite-filled suitcase by Poindexter and Rice.

In one of his appeals, Poindexter claimed that his attorneys at the time had not even asked for a copy of the police call recording, which was never shown during the trial.

However, different judges determined that Poindexter and Rice’s life sentences were affirmed because the later-raised suspicions about the tape were insufficient to justify a new trial. Advocates begged the Nebraska Pardons Board to commute their sentences, but it refused.

As mandated by state law, a grand jury will look into Poindexter’s death; nevertheless, officials have stated that he was receiving treatment for an undisclosed illness before to his passing. A year ago, Poindexter’s supporters claimed he had Parkinson’s disease¬†and serious kidney illness in an appeal to Nebraska’s recently elected governor.

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