The Top 10 Riskiest Jobs in the World 2023: Careers with the Highest Level of Risk

Every employee should be aware of the dangers specific to their industry and their rights in the event that they suffer an injury at work, as thousands of workers lose their lives there each year. The help required to file a workers’ compensation case and obtain compensation following a job injury can be obtained from a worker’s compensation attorney. Unfortunately, many workers will never fully recover from work-related injuries because they can either change or end their lives.

Even while everyone can get hurt, certain vocations are considerably riskier than others. The Bureau of Labour Statistics’ statistics on the number of fatal work injuries per 100,000 full-time workers was analyzed by Forbes to identify the professions with the highest risk. These ten vocations are the most dangerous in the world, according to that research.

Here are top 10 Riskiest Jobs in the World 2023: 

1. Logging Workers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 43
  • Fatal injury rate: 82 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 3.1 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $47,900
  • Most common fatal accident: Contact with objects and equipment

To produce raw materials for construction, loggers harvest trees. The industry as a whole harvests thousands of acres of forests every year, frequently in remote locations and during bad weather. This is a profession where a college degree is not necessary, and many loggers train on the job to operate specialized equipment and adhere to safety protocols in the forests.

Due to the physically demanding nature of their jobs and issues with the large machinery they must operate in order to process downed wood, forestry workers suffer a high death toll.

2. Fishing and Hunting Workers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 23
  • Fatal injury rate: 75 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 4.2 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $58,820
  • Most common fatal accident: Transportation incidents

Workers in the fishing and hunting industries are in charge of catching and trapping a broad range of fish and land animals. Employees may work on boats, in forests, or in other remote locations. They may also employ specialized tools, such as nets, firearms, and traps. In this field, only a minimal degree is needed to work, and most people pick up skills on the job.

Workers in the fishing and hunting industries frequently travel to isolated places in search of wildlife, hence accidents involving transportation account for a large number of injuries and fatalities in these fields.

3. Roofers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 115
  • Fatal injury rate: 59 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 2.4 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $51,190
  • Most common fatal accident: Falls, slips, and trips

Installing and maintaining roofs on both residential and commercial structures is the responsibility of roofers. To waterproof a roofing surface, roofers generally apply shingles, metal, asphalt, or other materials. They could provide their services in any kind of weather and frequently work at extremely high altitudes. The majority of roofing professions don’t require a college degree; instead, roofers can pick up the necessary skills through apprenticeships or on-the-job training.

Because roofers operate on the top of big structures, accidents involving falls, slips, and trips can be particularly fatal for those who carry out these activities.

4. Aircrafts Pilot and Flight Engineers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 68
  • Fatal injury rate: 48 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 5.4 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $189,620
  • Most common fatal accident: Transportation incidents

Pilots of airlines and helicopters are in charge of operating both commercial and private aircraft, while flight engineers are in charge of a wider range of duties such as keeping an eye on the plane’s mechanical systems, engine, and fuel levels. In this industry, much training is necessary.

The biggest risk for flight engineers and airline pilots is flying in private and helicopters instead of commercial aircraft since these smaller aircraft have fewer safety features and piloting equipment.

5. Structural Iron and Steel Workers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 14
  • Fatal injury rate: 36 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 3.7 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $64,800
  • Most common fatal accident: Falls, slips, and trips

The purpose of structural iron and steel installation by ironworkers is to shape and support buildings, roadways, and bridges. Although building new structures is the majority of what they do, they can also help with demolition and rehabilitation. They frequently work in hazardous environments and at tremendous heights. Most people apprentice themselves into their trade.

The heights at which these workers do their occupations enhance the risk of a deadly fall, which contributes to the heightened level of risk they face.

6. Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors

Collectors of recyclables and refuse play a vital role in waste management and recycling, but they also carry a significant danger. In fact, based on recent figures, this employment is the ninth deadliest in the United States.

Because drivers can be erratic and have the tendency to become distracted, you should always exercise caution. My work involves a lot of stop-and-go, which raises the risk of roadside accidents. The Bureau of Labour Statistics’ most recent data shows that 31 fatalities were reported in 2016. Many of them were caused by employees falling off trucks, getting struck by cars while at work, or having accidents involving machinery.

  • fast-moving cars close to the collection locations
  • Insufficient vision in bad weather
  • Improper driving near waste collection trucks

7. Delivery and Truck Drivers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 1,032
  • Fatal injury rate: 29 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 3.5 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $48,240
  • Most common fatal accident: Transportation incidents

Through the transportation of commercial items, raw materials, and other products across town or across the nation, delivery and truck drivers contribute to the health of the American economy. This industry employs people to drive semi-trucks across the country and to deliver small quantities of products locally within specific locations.

Most of the time, delivery and truck drivers need a commercial licence, but not much formal schooling is needed. They are significantly more likely to be involved in a car accident than the majority of workers or people because they spend the most of their days on the road.

8. Underground Mining Machine Operators

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 10
  • Fatal injury rate: 27 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 2 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $59,340
  • Most common fatal accident: Contact with objects and equipment

The process of taking materials out of the earth, such as rock, coal, and ore, is called mining. Equipment made to load or move these minerals is used in mining. These devices include conveyors, shuttle or mine cars, and hoisting engines with cable-drawn scrapers or scoops. It is the responsibility of underground mining machine operators to handle this heavy, specialised equipment.

Mining workers are vulnerable to harm and even death from equipment contact since their workdays are spent operating big machines, frequently in hazardous environments.

9. Construction Trade Workers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 15
  • Fatal injury rate: 23 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 2.4 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $56,510
  • Most common fatal accident: Falls, slips, and trips

Workers in the construction industry construct both residential and commercial structures from the ground up as well as perform renovation and maintenance tasks. They frequently have to operate heavy machinery and perform risky tasks at heights. There is little need for formal education because the majority obtain their training on the job or through apprenticeships.

The “fatal four”—falls, getting stuck in or between items, getting struck by an object, and electrocution—occur so frequently in the construction sector.

10. Electrical Power-line Installers and Repairers

  • Number of fatal injuries (2021): 30
  • Fatal injury rate: 22 per 100,000 full-time workers
  • Non-fatal injury rate: 2.1 per 100 full-time workers
  • Average Salary: $82,770
  • Most common fatal accident: Transportation incidents

The people who install, maintain, and repair the equipment and power lines that supply energy to every American home and company are known as electrical power line installers and repairers. These employees typically finish apprenticeships and obtain on-the-job training. They travel to regions hit by storms and other disasters that harm the electrical grid, where they work under hazardous settings.

One of the main causes of fatality in the business is transportation-related mishaps, as workers must travel frequently to carry out installations or repairs.

In summary

Every worker confronts some risk while on the job, even though these are the most dangerous jobs.

Employers are accountable for maintaining a secure workplace and paying workers fairly when something goes wrong. In truth, employees can receive financial compensation for on-the-job injuries, including payment for medical expenses and lost income, without having to demonstrate that their employers were negligent, according to workers’ compensation rules in the majority of states.

It is critical that you are aware of your legal rights and have the assistance you need to navigate the workers’ compensation system in order to obtain the money you are entitled to in the event that you or a loved one is murdered or seriously injured at work.

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