Two New Alzheimer’s Drugs are Proving Effective in Delaying the Illness in its Early Stages

Leqembi and donanemab, two new Alzheimer’s drugs from Eli Lilly, are showing encouraging signs of reducing Alzheimer’s in its early stages.

Two New Alzheimer's Drugs are Proving Effective in Delaying the Illness in its Early Stages
Two New Alzheimer’s Drugs are Proving Effective in Delaying the Illness in its Early Stages

Leqembi and Donanemab, Two New Alzheimer’s Drugs from Eli Lilly

Two new Alzheimer’s drugs are demonstrating encouraging signs of slowing the disease in its first stages. FDA approval for Leqembi was granted in January and donanemab is still under consideration. Donanemab is at least as efficient as Leqembi a different Eli Lilly medication that was shown to slow the course of Alzheimer’s disease by roughly 27%. According to Christopher Scuderi, DO, FAAFP, Medical Director for Value Based Care at Northeast Florida Millennium Physician Group, the two new Alzheimer’s drugs are not a cure for Alzheimer’s. They can only help patients live independently for a longer period of time by assisting patients with early disease in slowing down the evolution of their condition.

The two new Alzheimer’s drugs approval also brings some crucial reminders regarding the specific populations they are approved for. Leqembi received standard FDA approval for the treatment of patients with moderate cognitive impairment both the Leqembi clinical trials and the donanemab clinical trials looked at patients with this disease. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s to determine whether a person qualifies for this two new Alzheimer’s drugs treatments. The criteria for this two new Alzheimer’s drugs will disqualified people with health conditions like heart disease, stroke, a history of cancer, brain damage and people with medical conditions such uncontrolled high blood pressure.

Leqembi Vs. Donanemab

Leqembi and donanemab the two new Alzheimer’s drugs are the first medications showing concrete evidence of halting cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer’s patients. Donanemab appeared to delay the decrease in memory and cognitive function for patients at an earlier stage of the disease by around 4.5 to 7.5 months during an 18 months period. Leqembi would be covered for the majority of Medicare patients who exhibit early indications of cognitive issues and elevated levels of amyloid as a result of this expanded coverage.

The two new Alzheimer’s drugs have not been explicitly contrasted in research studies and because the patients, designs and methodologies of each drug’s unique trials vary it is challenging to compare the two to ascertain which one may be more efficient. The study also discovered that edema and bleeding in the brain were the two main issues of the two new Alzheimer’s drugs. Compared to the Leqembi study the donanemab trial reported higher rates of bleeding and swelling.

Leave a Comment